Funding

  • By John Bailey
    March 9, 2011
  • March 1, 2011 - 2:00pm

    President Obama's fiscal year 2012 budget comes at important crossroads in both education reform as well as fiscal reform.  The $3.7 trillion budget request would reduce the deficit by $1.1 trillion over the next decade, two-thirds of which would come from spending cuts through a five-year freeze in discretionary spending. Read more

  • By John Bailey
    February 18, 2011

    The New York Times has a great interactive graphic of the President's 2012 budget request.  It depicts the size of the various budget components and if it is an increase (green) or decrease (red) compared to 2010 levels.  You can also isolate just the discretionary spending and zoom in for more detail.  Read more

  • By David DeSchryver
    February 13, 2011

    Politico reports that "[t]he White House plans to announce a slew of education initiatives next week in conjunction with the release of the 2012 budget, including a new iteration of the 'Race to the Top' program aimed at funding individual school districts rather than states. [...]

      Read more

  • By David DeSchryver
    February 10, 2011

    Wireless broadband for everyone and, yes, that includes rural locations.  If President Obama has his way, the US government will sell some wireless spectrum to make this happen and, along the way, reduce the deficit by an estimated $10 billion.  While such estimates rarely turn out to be correct, the sale of such spectrum will be exciting.  Now, how can education entrepreneurs and schools make the most of this upcoming opportunity? Ideas? 

      Read more

  • By David DeSchryver
    February 3, 2011

    The Federal fiscal year (FY) 2011 is not yet complete.  Congress should have completed it last fall, but that did not happen due to the elections.  Instead, the previous Congress passed, and the President signed, a continuing resolution (CR) that extended FY2010 spending levels for federal programs until March 4, 2011.  The CR provides Congress extra time, and funding, to review the President’s proposed FY2011 budget.   Read more

  • By David DeSchryver
    February 3, 2011

    Earlier this week, Whiteboard Advisors published its 2011 State Legislative Preview, commenting on the desperate attention to state deficits. Everything else, including education, is in the event horizon of this black hole issue. Read more

  • February 1, 2011

    There will be a lot of talk about “reform” in the states this year. Education reform, pension reform, health care reform, Medicaid reform, tax reform and immigration reform will be legislative priorities across the country. Reform is code. In this context reform does not necessarily mean better. It means cheaper. The discussion is not really about policy.  It will be about budget and how budget relates to other priorities.

    This document previews several issues to be debated heavily this year beginning, of course, with budgets.  Other priorities include: education, health care and pension reform, legislative redistricting, job creation, public private partnerships (P3), immigration and transportation.

      Read more

  • By David DeSchryver
    January 28, 2011

    The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) released its updated federal fiscal outlook for 2011 through 2021. It’s not cheery. Read more

  • By John Bailey
    January 26, 2011

    Yesterday, David wrote about the White House's enhanced SOTU-website.  Full text of the speech here. White House fact sheets here and here.  The Washington Post provides a fun way to compare this year's speech to previous years.  Word clouds at the bottomr depict the frequency of words used for the entire speech and also just the education section. 

    Rep. Kline issued a statement after the speech.  Education Insider co-publisher Andy Rotherham offers some reactions to the speech here and here.  EdWeek's coverage here.

    I thought it was generally a good speech, but was surprised at the rather lukewarm call for ESEA reauthorization.  It was stronger than last year's, but still rather tepid and lacking any real details other than increasing the number of STEM teachers.  It's not surprising that 56% of our Insiders think ESEA reauthorization will be delayed until 2013.

    This line also puzzled me, "That's why instead of just pouring money into a system that's not working, we launched a competition called Race to the Top."   Technically, most of the stimulus funds were poured into a system that isn't working - through Title I and other forumula programs. And the EduJobs bill poured $10 billion - more than two times the size of RttT - into supporting the status quo instead of adopting a cleantech approach of funding new innovations or scaling charters schools or online learning providers.   

      Read more

Clients with Monitor Report subscriptions can login here.