What We’re Reading: New Skills, Talent and Employment

Highlights
Walmart is dramatically increasing their use of virtual reality (VR) for associate training. Previously limited to use at Walmart Academies, the company will now provide VR headsets to every store for use in training.  Over 1 million associates will be able to access training on the 17,000 Oculus Go headsets in stores by the end of the year.
 
CLO explains the importance of tailoring learning and development practices to the new generation of employees, Gen Z, who are now beginning to enter the workforce.
 
According to The Wall Street Journal, New York City tech and finance companies are beginning to embrace apprenticeships as a way to train new hires and diversify their workforce, overcoming the notion that apprenticeships are only for manufacturing and construction jobs.
 
The “Global Workforce Trends” report found that 80% of employers are struggling with finding talent as a result of the changing markets. A majority of these companies (65%) have changed business strategy as a result of the lack of specific talent available. The report, released by the Allegis Group, surveyed nearly 700 talent acquisition stakeholders around the world.
 
study conducted by Deloitte Global and the Global Business Coalition for Education predicts that more than half of the nearly two billion youth worldwide will not have the necessary skills to participate in the workforce by 2030.
 
survey conducted by Udemy of more than 1,000 full-time employees in the U.S. found positive sentiments around work environment in general but identified stark gaps across demographics like gender, age, education level, and job title. According to the report, 45% of women believe their manager is not interested in their career compared to 30% of men.
 
Google announced a new program, Tech Exchange, that will send 65 students from 11 Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs) to the West Coast to build on their computer science skills starting this fall.  The program is an expansion of Google’s prior work with HBCUs and their other initiatives to increase diversity.
 
Corporate Learning and Development News
Walmart is dramatically increasing their use of virtual reality (VR) for associate training. Previously limited to use at Walmart Academies, the company will now provide VR headsets to every store for use in training.  Over 1 million associates will be able to access training on the 17,000 Oculus Go headsets in stores by the end of the year.
 
Forbes lists seven of the top training trends to notice in 2019, including developing competencies for future organizational goals, emphasizing communication skills, and C-suite and HR working together to better align goals.
 
CLO explains the importance of tailoring learning and development practices to the new generation of employees, Gen Z, who are now beginning to enter the workforce.
 
Credentials, Hiring, and Applicant Tracking News
According to The Wall Street Journal, New York City tech and finance companies are beginning to embrace apprenticeships as a way to train new hires and diversify their workforce, overcoming the notion that apprenticeships are only for manufacturing and construction jobs. (The Wall Street Journal, subscription required)
 
Target announced its plans to hire 120,000 workers for the holiday season, surpassing last year by 20 percent, and making it the largest hiring plan by a traditional retailer, equal only to Amazon’s announcement in 2017 to hire 120,000 workers.
 
Succession planning, for all positions and at every level, is an important part of overcoming the skills gap, according to HR Dive
 
The “Global Workforce Trends” report found that 80% of employers are struggling with finding talent as a result of the changing markets. A majority of these companies (65%) have changed business strategy as a result of the lack of specific talent available. The report, released by the Allegis Group, surveyed nearly 700 talent acquisition stakeholders around the world.
 
study conducted by Deloitte Global and the Global Business Coalition for Education predicts that more than half of the nearly two billion youth worldwide will not have the necessary skills to participate in the workforce by 2030.
 
Forbes discusses the shift from laborer to knowledge worker, highlighting the potential benefit of the United States adopting a German approach toalternative educational tracks for students, preparing students for jobs in manufacturing and other trades that are just as technical as Silicon Valley coding and require similarly specialized training, but do not require a degree.
 
According to a new study on the gig economy by the JPMorgan Chase Institute, drivers who transport people (Uber or Lyft) or things (Uber Eats or Postmates) through an app made, on average, 53 percent less in 2017 than they did in 2013. Spokespersons for both Uber and Lyft told Recode that this is due to an increase in part-time drivers, often working less than 10 hours per week, and that this is a potentially misleading headline because it does not examine hourly earnings, which is the metric that most drivers care about.
 
General HR News
survey conducted by Udemy of more than 1,000 full-time employees in the U.S. found positive sentiments around work environment in general, but identified stark gaps across demographics like gender, age, education level, and job title. According to the report, 45% of women believe their manager is not interested in their career compared to 30% of men. Additionally, 56% of employees say their managers get promoted before they are ready.
 
According to its first ever "Talent Intelligence and Management" Report from Eightfold.ai, while 84% of C-suite executives consider diversity a top priority,  77% feel that efforts toward increasing diversity in the workforce are ineffective. The report also noted that a secondary challenge for 66% of organizations is retention of talent as a major challenge, as 61% of employees don’t remain in one position for more than three years.
 
Employer Partnerships/Company Innovation
This week Trilogy Education announced an additional partnership to host a coding boot camp with Vanderbilt University. The Vanderbilt Coding Boot Camp will also be a 24-week program that student will be able to enroll in part-time beginning January 15, 2019.
 
Google announced a new program, Tech Exchange, that will send 65 students from 11 Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs) to the West Coast to build on their computer science skills starting this fall.  The program is an expansion of Google’s prior work with HBCUs and their other initiatives to increase diversity.
 
Study.com recently launched the Civic Scholars program, designed to give employees of city governments and civic organizations the opportunity to earn a no-cost bachelor’s degree in a flexible format. The city of Perris, California is the first municipality to introduce Civic Scholars to their employees.
 
Startups, Innovation, and Investment News
Simplilearn launched a new program, New-Hire Training Initiative, which helps new recruits become job ready prior to onboarding by using Simplilearn’s online training courses on digital-economy skills.
 
Macroeconomic Trends and Public Policy
In response to a new report from JP Morgan Chase, The Associated Pressnoted that the initial popularity of gig work prompted speculation that gig workers would occupy a larger portion of the workforce, but the report shows that 58 percent of drivers work three months or less each year, earning a growing share of their income elsewhere.
 
Reuters reported last week that the number of Americans filing for unemployment benefits fell, hitting a near 49-year low. Additionally, the labor market is viewed as being near or at full employment with job openings having hit an all-time high of 6.9 million in July.
 
A piece in U.S. News and World Report highlights the ways in which the investment of the United States into the education and healthcare for employees have diminished over time in comparison to that of other countries including China.
 
Other
A new report by Hired found that Netflix is the employer brand tech workers most want to work for, followed by Google, Tesla, SpaceX and Airbnb.